Upcoming rappers 2019

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I would describe Capsule as sort of a Japanease version of France’s Justice. Producer Yasutaka Nakata provides the hard-hitting techno beats and Toshiko Koshijima sings those catchy, auto-tuned vocals. Their music is often licensed by Japanese TV shows so there is a chance that you’ve heard some of their songs as themes floating around. Plus, they released their fifteenth album (!) Wave Runner in 2015, so they’ve been on the scene for a minute. While their influences are varied, they use bossa beats, British acid house bass lines, and a variety of other notable source styles, but it would be difficult to describe their music as anything but simply their own.

It’s called Modern Pop Vocal Production, and it’s designed to help you home-recording vocalists and producers get a richer, more dynamic, and harder-hitting sound on your vocal mixes. In other words: Want to sound like the hits on the radio sound without buying a $10K vintage microphone? Then take this course.

Music scholarships for high school seniors

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Brad Pack is an award-winning audio engineer, writer, and educator based in Chicago, IL. Brad holds a Master’s degree in Electronic Media Production. When he’s not in front of his laptop, Brad can be found in the mosh pit.

“If you want the piece to be a lament over someone’s death, then you will really tear into that… It doesn’t matter that it wasn’t really true then and it doesn’t matter if the code theory is dumb.”

But here’s the good thing. Before you go spending $6,000 on a professional studio, you don’t need a pristinely recorded full-length album under your belt at all. Demos are fine, but try to get a decently home-recorded and mixed couple of tracks together whenever possible. If it doesn’t sound perfect, that’s fine, just don’t print and sell copies of those songs yet. Just don’t think about booking local shows until you’ve got music to share.

So much of today’s new technologies tend to offer (at least in marketing speak) out-of-the-box solutions to musicians’ and students’ problems. Softwares and plugins, devices and networks, are all designed to minimize the rough edges around taking the time to learn things the hard way, practice them, and interact with things and people. And while these tools are optional, and do provide new avenues for creative expression and learning, they sometimes also skip over some crucial steps in the lifelong learning process of the artist, particularly those steps that historically have happened in the classroom.

Music research grants

“Rockstar”: It’s hard to say how many chords this song really has. The way I hear it, it’s a C minor thing in the intro, and then you’re just swimming in a G minor and E♭ fish tank for the rest of the song. So that’s either a modulation from C minor to G minor, or you just start on the iv chord which was quickly dispatched by ninjas — take your pick. Watch how the phrase leading up to the first chorus stretches it to nine bars, rather than your regular eight, and how the outro has an irregular number of bars, too. What’s cool about this is how it obfuscates where the different sections begin or end.

And while I’m on a food/beverage aside, La Cumbre Brewing Co. is a great local brewery that serves my favorite beer (Slice of Hefen; which actually is a slice of heaven) and just has a nice vibe about it. You’re guaranteed to make a friend here. It’s not too loud or stand-offish and they play excellent music.

Ethan Hein is a Doctoral Fellow in Music Education at New York University. He teaches music technology, production and education at NYU and Montclair State University. With the NYU Music Experience Design Lab, Ethan has taken a leadership role in the creation of new technologies for learning and expression, most notably the Groove Pizza. He is the instructor of the free Soundfly course series called Theory for Producers. He maintains a widely-followed and influential blog, and has written for various publications, including Slate, Quartz, and NewMusicBox.

In this new series of spotlights, we’re introducing our full roster of Soundfly Mentors so you can choose who you want to work with on your next project!

The short tape loop in the RE-100 still meant that you could only affect the delay so much. The RE-201 remedied this by using a longer tape loop that was spooled freely within a chamber with no reels. This loose spool approach resulted in less tape wear and fewer transient noises.